Philippine - Gone

 

Philippine - Gone

Philippine – Gone

 

ARTIST NAME: Philippine

 

SONG TITLE: Gone

 

ALBUM TITLE: Gone

 

RELEASE DATE: 03/04/2020

 

 GENRE: Country/Pop

 

Facebook

 

Twitter

 

Instagram

 

Deezer

 

iTunes

 

Spotify

 

Website

 

Big fan of Kacey Musgraves and Maggie Rogers? Looking for music that combines country influences with modern production and catchy hooks?

 

Then I must now present to you: Philippine. With her bright and luminous vocals, the 20-year-old singer and artist stuns you with lyrics about real-life experiences, and melodies that you won’t be able to forget quickly.

 

The singer’s country roots can still be discovered into her songwriting and into the big role the acoustic guitar plays in her music. But modern pop music and pop music from the 80s have also inspired her production, which can especially be heard in the percussion and the use of synthesizers.

 

Philippine has performed many times since she was a young girl, in places such as ESNS, 3FM, and the Old Luxor Theatre. This year her new music will be released, and she will announce her new tour dates after the Corona Crisis.

.

.

.

 

Tell us your source of inspiration.

Production-wise, I was very much inspired by Maggie Rogers. Especially by how she combines her folk roots with a modern pop sound. I wanted to do the same with my country music roots.

 

Songwriting wise, I’ve always been inspired by Kacey Musgraves. I really enjoy writing in pairs or groups of three, as they do in Nashville a lot, and I always want the lyrics to tell a story. That’s what Kacey Musgraves does very often too and that has been a huge inspiration to my writing.

 

Story-wise, I always let myself be inspired by everything around me in my life, and by everything I see happening to other people. I hardly ever make a story up; it must always contain a little truth or story about something I went through or someone that I know.

 

Gone was inspired by a difficult break-up I went through, and later became more about all the things that I had to let go in life in order to become happy again.

.

.

.

Discuss how you develop your music style.

I used to listen and perform a lot of country music, which subconsciously inspired my writing a lot.

 

I really wanted my songs to have a modern pop song though and wanted to see if there was a way to combine my love for modern pop music, and pop music from the 80s, together with my passion for country music.

 

In some of my songs, there’s more emphasis on the country part than others, sometimes it’s leaning more towards the pop sound. I wanted “Gone” to be the first single I released because I felt like it was a great balance of both.

.

.

.

 

Elaborate on multi-genre music.

The song can’t be seen as a traditional country song, because of the modern production, but also can’t fully be seen as a regular pop song, because of the light country and 80s influences. That’s why I always describe it as:

 

Pop music with light country and 80s influences.

.

.

.

 

Tell us the best means of reaching fans.

I think the best way to reach your fans would be to stay very content with your social media, show more than just your musical side, but also your personal one, and most of all are interesting. They need a reason to be willing to follow you and you as an independent artist are in total control of that.

.

.

.

 

Discuss the process involved in launching a musical career.

It, first, it starts with writing. The most important thing about a musical career is, in my opinion, good music. After you wrote your songs, find a fitting producer to record it with.

 

After the song has been recorded, arranged, mixed and mastered, you can submit it to a distributor, such as Distrokid or CD baby.

 

Make sure before you release something that you have enough content, such as pictures and videos, to share to promote your music, and make sure it looks aesthetic and fitting to the genre.

 

Build up suspense with your audience by posting loads of teasers and make sure everyone you know in the music industry is aware of your music being released soon. Once it’s out, try to come up with ways to involve your fans and keep promoting it.

.

.

.

 

Tell us how to develop a lyric to a full song.

I personally never start with a lyric; I always start with a melody or a chord progression. This works differently for every artist, but I seem to work better if I come up with the melody first, and then I try to mumble some words to it.

 

Once I came up with a story, I try to find the fitting words to fit both the story and the melody. I would suggest reading a lot and looking up lyrics from the artist that inspire you, see what kind of language they use.

.

.

.

 

Tell us how you come up with a melody.

I usually start by playing chords on the piano, or when I’m with a guitarist he starts by jamming some chords. I try to improvise and record it, then listen back to it, and see if I like something that I did. If I find something I like, I try to continue with it and match lyrics to it.

 

I really like to record improvising to come up with melodies, the best melodies in my experience were accidental ones.

.

.

.

 

Tell us your ideal type of recording studio.

I think the most important thing is the atmosphere between you and the people you are recording it with.

 

I’ve recorded in very fancy studios and in-home studios as well, and it honestly doesn’t matter as much to me as the person you’re recording it with does.

 

If you have a connection with your producer, I think you can come a long way with budget instruments and a cheaper studio.

.

.

.

 

Describe the factors you consider in a good song.

It differs per song. I can be drawn by a good lyric just as much as a good melody. I just think it’s important that the structure of the song is clear and that it has a purpose, whether it’s to tell a story or to convey a certain feeling.

.

.

.

 

Tell us how you impact your listeners with your songs.

I hope I can impact my listeners by my lyrics being clear and honest, and I think my songs are easy to listen to and recognizable for a lot of people.

.

.

.

 

Tell us how you interact with producers and music directors.

I think it’s very important for me to have a good relationship with my producer, as we’re both contributing a big part to the arrangement of the song, and it’s important that we’re on the same page.

.

.

.

 

Tell us how you feel after the completion of a song.

After I finish writing or completing a song, I feel almost like I solved a very difficult math equation or kind of as completing a puzzle.

 

I love the creating part of music a lot, but sometimes it takes a lot of time to get it where you want it to get, and finishing it feels very rewarding and exciting.

.

.

.

 

Tell us your worst song and state the reason.

I think my worst songs are either the ones I didn’t even bother to finish, or the ones I simply finished too quickly. The reason is probably my impatience, I sometimes find it difficult to finish a song.

 

My tip would be to always take your time to finish your song, and if you don’t like it, move on to the next. That way it’s not a waste because you still practice your writing.

.

.

.

 

Tell us what you will change in your music.

I hope that in the future I can try a lot of different styles and discover different sides of me as a musician. I wouldn’t necessarily change anything about the way it is right now, but I do hope to develop and grow a lot over the next coming years.

.

.

.

 

Tell us what is special about this release.

It’s special to me because it is my first release ever, and I’ve put in a lot of time and effort. The song has been through a lot of development and changes since I first wrote it, and the whole learning process, of it, has been very useful.

 

Also, the message of the song is very important to me: you can always choose to let go of things and you can always start over.

.

.

.

 

Tell us about your future goals.

I would like to release as much music as I can in the next ten years and perform a lot. It would be cool to go on tour with my band and create a lot more music.

 

Eventually, I could see myself working as a songwriter for other artists as well, this is something I could see myself doing for the rest of my life.

.

.

.

 

Tell us how you overcome obstacles.

Any obstacle is a different challenge of course, but I think what I try to do as much as I can is to stay positive and to share my thoughts with the people I love.

 

I’ve learned the best way to overcome obstacles is not to do it by yourself, but also learn from your mistakes. Don’t ask for the same advice if you aren’t going to take it.

.

.

.

 

Elaborate on the song.

Gone is about letting go of what doesn’t make you happy anymore, whether that’s a friendship, a relationship, a home, or even a bad habit.

 

It’s about longing for a fresh start and deciding it’s about time.

.

.

.

 

Elaborate on your artist’s name and the title of the album.

My artist’s name is my first name. It’s a French name that my parents gave me, and it didn’t feel right using an artist’s name that wasn’t mine, so I decided to just go with it.

 

The title of the album is not out yet, as the album hasn’t been released yet, just the first single.

 


Leave a Reply


SIGN INTO YOUR ACCOUNT CREATE NEW ACCOUNT

 
×
 
×
FORGOT YOUR DETAILS?
×

Go up