ARTIST NAME: Elle Exxe

 

SONG TITLE: Before I Break

 

RELEASE DATE: 20th April 2020

 

GENRE: Anti-pop

 

Twitter

 

Facebook

 

Instagram

 

Website

 

Deezer

 

Spotify

 

iTunes

 

Returning after her glistening “Rose Gold” February release, Elle Exxe is back with a bi-polar bop titled “Before I Break”.

 

This is the second single in Exxe’s 2020 series which sees her drop new music on the 20th of every 2nd month this year (with piano versions on the months in-between).

 

April marks Stress Awareness Month and with Covid-19 and self-isolation having brought mental health challenges to many, Exxe has chosen to donate profits from “Before I Break” to mental health charities Rethink and Shout.

 

Rethink support those with mental health problems (which 1 in 4 of us will be affected by in our lifetime). Shout provide a crisis text line – available to those in the UK via the number: 85258

 

Exxe penned the lyrics to “Before I Break” during her 2019 tour in Sweden.

 

She says “I wrote ‘Before I Break’ during a really complicated time for me mentally and physically. I thought ‘keep calm and carry on’ was the best way to handle things, but this time the stress hit me physically and was temporarily debilitating and scary.”

 

She turned to music as her medicine and hopes that her music will be that for others.

 

A fragile yet fierce song that packs plenty of punch, Elle Exxe isn’t letting up with “Before I Break” and will return with her piano session of the song on 20th May.

 

 

 

At 16 Edinburgh-born Linda Harrison (now known as Elle Exxe) dropped out of school, wrote and released her first album, and drove to London (UK) to follow her dreams.

 

Too young to enjoy the fruits of the capital’s nightlife, she camped out in a box-room in a local YMCA writing songs and recording acoustic cover videos for YouTube.

 

Before long she’d racked up over 1 million views, played her first string of UK festivals, and was being inundated with requests from world-famous record producers and bigwigs within the music business.

 

Despite her notoriety, Harrison felt unfulfilled; she’d become better known for her sombre acoustic covers than her painstakingly intricate electronically produced originals, and that was her true passion.

 

 

Her performances on stage were notably wild, upbeat, and energetic with guitars, drums, and electronics, but her online persona was the opposite.

 

In 2015 Harrison reinvented herself as Elle Exxe and started from scratch. A brave decision to transition which thankfully paid off ten-fold.

 

In the last year, the formidable and fully fledged electro-clash pop star has traveled the world storming major festivals like V Festival, Sziget, Untold, SXSW and Isle of Wight, climbed into the Top 10 in the UK Music Week charts, gained worldwide radio airplay, garnered rave reviews from the likes of Classic Pop Magazine, GayTimes, Q Magazine, and PopJustice, and has even collected her first award for Best Female Artist at the UMAs.

 

 

After releasing her empowering anthem “Queen” in March 2018 her intentions are clear – she will not bow down and she will earn her crown as 21st Century Music Royalty.

.

.

.

Share your life story with us. 

Born and raised in Edinburgh (Scotland), a super-rich and cultural place to be. I got started on the piano at age 6 and started saxophone a couple of years later, it wasn’t long before I was writing songs and putting videos out on YouTube.

 

I experienced quite a lot of death and heartache in my formative years which added to my teens feeling like an emotional rollercoaster, but I put all my pain into my music.

 

I always knew I wanted to do music, so I felt like school was a prison, so I managed to drop out, release an album, and head to the bright lights of London as I turned 17.

 

After a few years, I hit over 1million views on YouTube but decided that piano ballads weren’t for me anymore. I wanted to be like Freddie Mercury. I stopped my YouTube channel and re-named myself Elle Exxe and haven’t looked back.

.

.

.

List the names of those that have supported you so far in your music career and use this opportunity to thank them. 

There are way too many to list them all, so I’ll stick with my favourite number: 2.

 

Thank you to my old manager Umong Shah, we did some incredible things together from playing my first show abroad at Canadian Music Week, to touring across the world playing festivals in South Korea, USA, Russia, UK and more.

 

Thanks also to my agent Iggy at Strange Place/Marshall Arts for helping me put on my ExXtravaganzZa’s and getting me on Sziget Festival and V Fest!

.

.

.

Narrate your experience while recording in the studio or while touring. 

I never feel like there’s much of a story about recording in the studio. It’s a very intimate thing, but visually and descriptively, it’s not that interesting!

 

But touring is wild. Early mornings, late nights, 8-hour drives across unknown territory, meeting all types of people. It’s exhilarating.

.

.

.

Discuss your songwriting. 

I write from a place of passion. When I started out, I just wanted to write a song that people would relate to so that I could relate to them too. It was a ‘therapy’ and I wanted to help make people feel less alone, but I also wanted to feel less alone, I wanted to build a community of caring people. So, I try to write honestly, even when the truth is ugly.

 

I started out writing on the piano, but now I like to write to a beat. I love writing with others, collaborating brings a whole new energy to the music, and it stops me from doubting myself and my ideas.

.

.

.

Elaborate on your future projects.

I’m currently releasing a song on the 20th of every 2nd month (with a piano session of the song on the alternate months).

.

.

.

Tell us what you are doing to increase your fan base. 

I’m treating them like people, not like numbers. So many people get lost in the statistics, and I don’t want to get caught in that trap.

 

I speak to my fans, and I try and help them where I can. It’s the least I can do when they’re so supportive of me. I might’ve given up a long time ago if I didn’t have the support of strangers.

.

.

.

Tell us that point in time you wanted to give up on your music career. 

After I released Catapult and Queen. The year I released Catapult was also the year I’d canceled my wedding to play at V Festival. But I released Catapult and it felt like it was greeted with an eerie silence. And then I went on a tour supporting another artist, but almost every venue we played was empty.

 

After that, I went on a USA tour, but it was during some really crazy weather – everywhere we went there were snowstorms, which meant attendance was nowhere near where it needed to be for me to break even, and in the midst of all of this, my bassist quit the band and tension was building cause I couldn’t pay anyone what they wanted to be paid. I was in more debt than I ever had been, and it felt like I was unable to do anything but let people down.

 

I said to myself, “if I don’t see progress in 12 months, I’ve got to stop this and try something else” – but, about 2 weeks after deciding the 12-month deadline, I felt way more relaxed and remembered why I got into music…also, I realized there weren’t any other jobs that I could do. So, I decided I’d never give up because music is in my blood, it’s what makes me want to wake up every morning…that and my loved ones and community.

.

.

.

Go into detail on how you make your instrumentation or melody. 

It’s all about listening and finding what sounds right. I often add a lot of instrumentation when I’m writing a song, but once it’s written, I’ll start stripping it back so that you only hear what’s essential, otherwise it’s information overload.

.

.

.

Tell us your complete understanding of music licensing. 

Music licensing is quite a lucrative side of the music industry. It’s where people buy your song to exploit it in some way. So that can be to license it to a film where you will get an upfront fee plus an ongoing royalty (depending on the deal of course), or it can be to license it to a record label who will promote it but then take a percentage.

 

I’ve had my music licensed on a Google advert, loads of TV soaps, sports TV shows, short films, and all sorts.

.

.

.

Tell us about your favourite genre of music. 

Anti-pop is my favourite genre. It’s kind of like bedroom-pop or lo-fi pop that’s a little more left-field than what’s generically in the charts, but it’s still got hooks and great vocals, often with unique lyrical ideas.

.

.

.

Tell us the theme of most of your songs. 

My life.

.

.

.

Elaborate on this song. 

‘Before I Break’ was written during a difficult and dark moment for me. I was stuck in a stressful situation but was managing to keep calm when one day I woke up and my vision was completely blurred. I felt sick, and the pain was crazy intense, but I had to work, I was in Sweden, and I had an important meeting and co-writing session. So even though I couldn’t see, I had to get my ass to the studio and write a song. So, I just wrote exactly what I was feeling. Once I was better, and I heard the song back, I felt guilty for the negative thoughts I’d had, but it was important for me to remain honest, even though the truth felt ugly.

 

The dynamics are kind of bipolar, it’s very fragile and then very fierce, which is how it felt to be inside my brain at the time.

 

Joakim Buddee produced and wrote it with me, he’s an incredible talent.

.

.

.

Discuss digital distribution and streaming. 

There are loads of digital music distribution companies that make it easy for artists to be their own label and upload their music to Spotify, Apple Music, iTunes, Amazon, Deezer, Tidal, etc.

 

As a consumer, it’s never been easier to listen to music. Almost the entire history of music is at our fingertips for a criminally low price. It is possible for someone to upload their album to Spotify and make a living from it.

.

.

.

Tell us numerous ways that artists can boost their revenue. 

There are grants available from many music support bodies in the UK like Help Musicians, PRSF, Arts’ Council, etc. Seeking out sync/licensing opportunities. Using soundbetter.com to get paid opportunities to collaborate. Making unique merchandise that you yourself would want, and therefore hopefully your fans will buy.

.

.

.

Tell us your opinion on self-training and enrolling in an educational institution to study music. 

I think both are valid. Even when you are taught by an educator, much of the work you do to really learn is on your own; it’s when you practice, it’s when you memorize the notes you took. So self-training is an important skill to have, but if you have an educator available to you, it’ll help you get the information you might need to train yourself faster.

.

.

.

Go on at length on what it takes to write a hit song. 

Everyone has got what it takes to write a hit song. There is no formula. There is nothing missing from one song that stops it from being a hit. It’s about having the right story at the right time.

 

A hit is a phenomenon that can’t be predicted. Just look at Colonel Tom Moore’s money-raising walk for the NHS – if he’d been 98, the story might not have had such appeal, or if we weren’t in the middle of a pandemic, he wouldn’t have got so much attention. In fact, there are plenty of people of all ages raising money right now, but this one guy raised over £30mil – what’s the difference between him and them? A story, and timing. It’s the same with music…there are some TERRIBLE hits and there are some INCREDIBLE hits, but with each one, the most important thing has been timing.

.

.

.

State your artist’s name and elaborate on it. 

My artist’s name is Elle Exxe. Elle means “she” in French. Exxe has 2 x’s representing the double XX chromosome that women have. There are 2 X’s and 2 L’s, and 2 E’s in each name, and there are 2 syllables. 2 is my favourite number.

 

Elle is pronounced L and Exxe is pronounced X. L is my real initial for my birth name, and X represents the kiss I would leave if I was signing off an email: L x. My best friend growing up was called Ellen (pronounced L N) and her sister was called Elsie (pronounced L C), we used to joke that I was their adopted sister, so L X would be my name if that were the case.

.

.

.

State the title of the song and the meaning. 

Before I Break. The meaning is that sometimes we wish we were in somebody else’s shoes, and sometimes we wish somebody would try a day in our shoes…but either way, we are who we are, and we need to be gentler on ourselves and others.

.

.

.

State the title of one of your albums and the reason for choosing the title.

My 2016 album was titled “Love Fuelled Hate”. I love all things high-contrast and contradicting. When love goes back it can turn to hate, and the album was split into two halves – the first told a love story, which broke down into a hate-story, before reaching acceptance.


Leave a Reply


SIGN INTO YOUR ACCOUNT CREATE NEW ACCOUNT

 
×
 
×
FORGOT YOUR DETAILS?
×

Go up